Huge Fulton Market Project Could Also Bring a New Metra Station

The growth of Chicago’s Fulton Market District has been nothing short of incredible over the last decade.  Underbuilt land, proximity to The Loop, and a “me, too” attitude by developers and tech companies trying to gather the crumbs falling from the Google gravy train have vaulted the area from urban workhorse, over hipster haven, straight into bustling tech hub.  It’s a taxman’s dream come true.

Rendering of 1200 West Fulton Market (via The IBT Group)

Rendering of 1200 West Fulton Market (via The IBT Group)

The latest Next Big Thing™ proposed for the former slaughterhouse district is an enormous commercial development from IBT Group and Lamb Partners.  This kind of urban transformation isn’t new to IBT, which is walking distance away.  It’s the firm responsible for the Near West Side Target store.

IBT doesn’t have a name for the 1.2 million square-foot building, which will eat the entire 3.3 acre 1200 block of West Fulton Market.  It was designed by New York’s S9 Architecture, which has made a name for itself stacking blocks on top of blocks and making them hang over each other from Brooklyn to the bluffs of Saint Paul.  If you’re into that sort of thing, this Fulton Market project won’t disappoint.

Crain’s Chicago Business was the beanspiller-in-chief on this one, and reports that it the block’s tower will be 24 stories tall.  A boutique hotel is also planned, along with streetfront retail all for the bargain price of a half-billion dollars.

Rendering of 1200 West Fulton Market (via The IBT Group)

Rendering of 1200 West Fulton Market (via The IBT Group)

Buried in the Crain’s piece is a note that Chicago officials are asking Metra to consider a new West Town station at Ashland Avenue, which would help bring even more office development to the neighborhood.  Marketing material for this project, however, shows the potential new Metra station at Ogden Avenue, which would also be welcome.  It also shows eight adjacent city blocks ripe for complementary development, and potentially Amazon’s HQ2.  However, most non-Chicago analysts rank Chicago’s chances of getting HQ2 at a distant fifth or worse, with New York and San Francisco currently leading the pack.

from Chicago Architecture https://www.chicagoarchitecture.org/2017/11/06/huge-fulton-market-project-could-also-bring-a-new-metra-station/

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Now Open: Landmark West Loop

Another Near West Side residential building recently celebrated its grand opening.  Landmark West Loop actually started welcoming residents at the beginning of August with a soft opening, but now things are officially official.

Rendering of 1035 West Van Buren

Rendering of 1035 West Van Buren

The building is conveniently located on the banks of the Eisenhower Expressway, across the highway from the U.I.C. campus, and across the street from Target.  It’s also just six blocks from the West Loop.

It sports 300 residences across 31 stores at 1035 West Van Buren Street.  Homes run from 500 to just shy of 2,000 square feet at rates from $1,740 to $6,200/month.

This is actually the second plan for this space.  At the turn of the century, the city approved a plan to put up a residential building here that was 30% taller.  It also had a very 90’s post-modern design, like an outsized French chateau.  What eventually got built, by a new developer (Related Midwest) and a new architecture firm (New York’s Morris Adjmi Architects), is far more modern while at the same time blending in better with the neighborhood.

Press release follows the photos.  You know the drill.

Landmark West Loop (courtesy of Related Midwest)
Landmark West Loop (courtesy of Related Midwest)
Landmark West Loop (courtesy of Related Midwest)
Landmark West Loop (courtesy of Related Midwest)
Landmark West Loop (courtesy of Related Midwest)
Landmark West Loop (courtesy of Related Midwest)
Landmark West Loop (courtesy of Related Midwest)
Landmark West Loop (courtesy of Related Midwest)
Landmark West Loop (courtesy of Related Midwest)
Landmark West Loop (courtesy of Related Midwest)
Landmark West Loop (courtesy of Related Midwest)
Landmark West Loop (courtesy of Related Midwest)
Landmark West Loop (courtesy of Related Midwest)
Landmark West Loop (courtesy of Related Midwest)
Landmark West Loop (courtesy of Related Midwest)
Landmark West Loop (courtesy of Related Midwest)
Landmark West Loop (courtesy of Related Midwest)
Landmark West Loop (courtesy of Related Midwest)
Landmark West Loop (courtesy of Related Midwest)
Landmark West Loop (courtesy of Related Midwest)
Landmark West Loop (courtesy of Related Midwest)
Landmark West Loop (courtesy of Related Midwest)
Landmark West Loop (courtesy of Related Midwest)
Landmark West Loop (courtesy of Related Midwest)
Landmark West Loop (courtesy of Related Midwest)
Landmark West Loop (courtesy of Related Midwest)

Related Midwest Celebrates Opening of Landmark West Loop in Chicago

Morris Adjmi-designed tower is first West Loop apartment tower to deliver in 2017

CHICAGO (Nov. 1, 2017) — Related Midwest recently celebrated the grand opening of Landmark West Loop, the developer’s 31-story, 300-unit luxury rental tower at 1035 W. Van Buren St. in Chicago’s West Loop. Designed by New York-based Morris Adjmi Architects, the glass-and-steel high-rise – Related Midwest’s third luxury rental offering in downtown Chicago – was the first apartment building to open in the West Loop in 2017, welcoming its first residents Aug. 1.

The building’s grand opening event, held on Oct. 24 and inspired by Landmark’s identity as “A New Local Standard” in the West Loop, included pop-up shops from neighborhood designers and retailers All Choked Up, Luxury Garage Sale, T&J Designs, Sanem’s and Christina Karin. In addition, local chefs Justin Behlke of Pilot Light and Alex Theodoroff of MAD Social prepared samples of popular menu items on-site in the building’s demonstration kitchen, while West Loop staple The Publican catered the event.

“In opening Landmark West Loop, we’ve unlocked a largely undiscovered corner of the West Loop that is brimming with aspirational students and professionals who want to live where they work and study,” said Curt Bailey, president of Related Midwest. “Every detail of this project was carefully considered, from the stunning silhouette by Morris Adjmi, to the craftsman-inspired interiors from Reunion Goods & Services, to the thoughtful programming by our own design and development teams. These partnerships have resulted in a triumph of luxury housing tailor-made for this lively, progressive neighborhood, which has already attracted Google, McDonald’s and other high-profile employers.”

Landmark West Loop offers a mix of studio, convertible, one-, and two-bedroom apartments, along with two- and three-bedroom penthouses. Residences range in size from 500 to 1,960 square feet, including the penthouses, with pricing starting at $1,740 per month for studios, $1,975 for convertibles, $2,495 for one-bedrooms, and $2,910 for two-bedrooms. Three-bedroom, 2½-bath penthouses are priced from $6,195 per month.

Four decorated models – a studio, two one-bedrooms and one two-bedroom corner unit – highlight Landmark’s open layouts and modern finishes. Each apartment includes 9-foot ceilings, floor-to-ceiling windows, custom plank flooring, solid-core wood interior doors, spacious closets, in-unit laundry and resident-controlled Nest thermostats. High-end kitchens showcase custom storm gray-colored cabinetry, quartz countertops, white subway tile backsplashes, open shelving, high-performance Bosch appliances, and mobile stainless steel islands in select plans. Baths feature hexagon tile flooring, quartz countertops, custom-designed vanities and walk-in showers with frameless glass surrounds.

Residents of Landmark West Loop have access to nearly 12,000 square feet of amenity space, including Landmark Sport & Social, a landscaped sun deck with skyline views and a pool, spa, cabanas, lounge areas, fire pit, outdoor kitchens and dog run.

Indoor amenities include an adjacent pool house with ping-pong, shuffleboard and arcade games, as well as a 3,500-square-foot fitness center that features Peloton bikes, Gym Rax and TRX mounting systems, Hammer Strength weightlifting equipment and an adjacent yoga studio. Other common areas include a community-supported agriculture (CSA) room with seasonal programming; The Den, a reservable lounge with a big-screen TV, seating areas and an adjacent demonstration kitchen and dining room; and the Living Library, an expansive co-working and social gathering area with a copper-hooded fireplace, multiple seating areas and communal work tables.

“The Living Library is truly the heart of the amenity floor – a comfortable, inviting space that sets itself apart through simplicity,” said Bailey. “It’s an example of how we’ve crafted Landmark West Loop around the lifestyles of our residents, using legacy projects like 500 Lake Shore Drive to learn how today’s renters truly live and work.”

Residents of Landmark West Loop can also take advantage of 24-hour concierge service, move-in coordination by RelatedStyle Services, on-site dry cleaning and laundering by Pressbox, secure package delivery by Luxer One, pet spa services by Baroo, and a secure bike storage room.

Landmark West Loop is the first project in Chicago designed by Morris Adjmi Architects, whose portfolio of work includes 837 Washington, an award-winning office building across from the High Line in Manhattan’s Meatpacking District; and the Wythe Hotel, a refurbished factory on the Brooklyn waterfront.

Landmark’s textile-rich interiors, created by Reunion Goods & Services, feature hand-crafted furniture, light fixtures and artwork by acclaimed artisans, several of whom are from the Chicago area. The multi-colored, dip-dyed birch wall in the Living Library was created by Chicago-based installation artist Tom Slazinski – his first permanent commercial art installation. Meanwhile, the tower’s lobby is home to two paintings: the “Blah Blah Blah,” a colorful word painting by American artist Mel Bochner, a pioneer of conceptual art; and “World Map #5,” a painting by Chicago native Amanda Ross-Ho.

“Together, these curated pieces create unexpected, whimsical moments as residents and their guests move from one room to the next,” said Ann Thompson, vice president of architecture and design at Related Midwest. “Walking through Landmark is much like walking through a contemporary art gallery or museum – but one that feels like home.”

In addition to designing Landmark West Loop’s amenity spaces, Reunion Goods & Services also decorated the tower’s studio, one-bedroom and two-bedroom models. The fourth model, a one-bedroom southwest corner unit, was created by Havenly, an online interior design service that pairs users with a dedicated designer. Landmark residents receive an exclusive discount for Havenly that can be used to put the finishing touches on their own apartments.

Also available to residents is a complimentary one-year membership to Divvy or a membership to Equinox gyms – both affiliate lifestyle companies of Related – for the duration of their leases. In addition, residents are able to choose their own cable and internet provider. Options include discounted ultra-high-speed internet service from Webpass with free Google Home and Google Chromecast devices – part of Landmark’s Smart Apartment Suite. Services from AT&T and Comcast are also available.

Along with proximity to the Illinois Medical District, University of Illinois at Chicago campus and jobs throughout the West Loop – McDonald’s new headquarters is less than a mile north of the property – Landmark West Loop is steps from public transportation, with the UIC-Halsted Blue Line station just two blocks away. Residents are also within walking distance of world-class restaurants and nightlife, such as Randolph Street’s famed Restaurant Row, as well as nearby retail, including a full-size Target a half-block west of the community.

from Chicago Architecture https://www.chicagoarchitecture.org/2017/11/06/now-open-landmark-west-loop/

A New Stadium and Pro Team for Chicago?

Following up on all the ballyhoo surrounding every city in North America getting down on one knee begging Amazon.com to go to the prom, or at least locate its second headquarters in their town, the Chicago Tribune published an article titled “Amazon Stadium? Chicago developer hopes it’s the ticket to HQ2.”

Rendering of Amazon.com Stadium.  Not as terrible a name as the KFC Yum! Center.  Or Talking Stick Resort Arena. Or Guaranteed Rate Field. (Sterling Bay)

Rendering of Amazon.com Stadium. Not as terrible a name as the KFC Yum! Center. Or Talking Stick Resort Arena. Or Guaranteed Rate Field. (Sterling Bay)

Inside that story was this bit of information from developer Sterling Bay, which is putting naming rights to a new stadium on its silver platter:

“Sterling Bay is currently engaged in active discussions with the city of Chicago, professional sports leagues and international entertainment production companies to partner on the development and operations of this venue.”

Wait… what?

Is Sterling Bay really trying to bring another professional sports team to Chicago to inhabit a new stadium in its Lincoln Yards project where Finkl Steel used to be on Goose Island?  Or is this just the kind of puffery that real estate companies play? Like hinting that every retail project, no matter how small or unlikely, will have an Apple Store.

Chicagoland already has professional baseball, basketball, hockey, women’s basketball, and softball.  So what’s left?

The National Lacrosse League recently expanded to Philadelphia and San Diego, so that’s a possibility.  And Major League Rugby is scheduled to launch next year, so maybe that’s what Sterling has a shine for.

Or is it possible that the developer wants to poach a team from one of their current homes?  It seems nothing is sacred this year, so imagine the White Sox becoming the second north side team.  Or the Blackhawks coming closer to downtown.  Considering all the development money the Ricketts family  just sank into Wrigleyville, it’s probably safe to say the Cubbies aren’t going anywhere.

So unless cricket is about to explode in Chicago in a big way, we’re stumped to figure out what sports league could be in play.  If you have any ideas, let us know below.

 

 

from Chicago Architecture https://www.chicagoarchitecture.org/2017/10/31/a-new-stadium-and-pro-team-for-chicago/

South Side Industrial Landmark to Come Tumbling Down

You may have seen it, but not really noticed it, as you motored along I-57 past Chicago’s Fernwood neighborhood.  But that’s OK, because soon the giant chimney that rises high above the Chicago Department of Water’s Roseland Pumping Station will be gone.

Roseland Pumping Station (via Apple Maps)

Roseland Pumping Station (via Apple Maps)

The bad news is that the neighborhood will lose a navigational touchstone.  The good news is that the Prairie-style public works castle that houses the actual water works will remain.

The chimney is no longer necessary because back when the station was designed by William G. Krieg and built in 1911 by the former Chicago Bureau of Public Efficiency, it used enormous boilers to generate steam to run the pumps.  Twenty years ago the water department started spending $43 million to replace the steam-powered pumps with electrical pumps, fed from the new warehouse-looking transformer building to the south.

Now that the steam is gone, the chimney also needs to go.  At 270 feet, it’s taller than the Palmer House hotel in The Loop, or even the old Lawson YMCA building in the Gold Cost, but without a forest of surrounding skyscrapers to mute its stature.

If you’re a shutterbug, it’s worth taking the trip down to 104th and Harvard (CTA buses 8A and/or 103) to get a picture of the pump house.  It was built four-stories tall to handle the massive machines of a century ago.  Today, though most of that volume is empty since modern pumps are much smaller.

But the mission of the building is no less vital than it was during the Taft administration.  It slurps water from the Edward Dunne crib in Lake Michigan via the 68th Street Pumping Station and then squirts it out to a thirsty far-south side.  This H2O hub is responsible for moistening most everyone south of 75th Street in Chicago, plus a few nearby suburbs.

The upgrade also added an extra 125 million gallons of capacity to the facility, so more water can be sold to the suburbs in the future.

And if you’re into Chicago history trivia, this building’s address used to be 104th and Stewart Avenue.   The address was changed to 104th and Princeton when the railroad came through the neighborhood and erased Stewart.  It’s an unusual case of a railroad not being there first.

 

from Chicago Architecture https://www.chicagoarchitecture.org/2017/10/30/south-side-industrial-landmark-to-come-tumbling-down/

Chicago’s Theater District Gets a New Hotel

The transformation of the tower above the Oriental Theater in The Loop is finally complete.  The building has been renovated from offices into a new boutique hotel.

There were several plans floated for the building in the last few years, as downtown has started bulging with new tourists, residents, and students.  Everything from a condo conversion to student housing was on the table at one time or another.  But Murphy Development managed to be the party to give the venerable Rapp & Rapp-designed building new life at a home away from home.

The tower is now open as the Cambria Hotel Chicago Loop Theatre District, using the reverse adjective grammar common in the hospitality industry these days.

It features 199 rooms on floors three through 22, with back office operations stuffed into the two basement levels.

Press release follows.

Oriental Theater tower (Courtesy of Artefaqs architecture stock photography)

Oriental Theater tower (Courtesy of Artefaqs architecture stock photography)

ROCKVILLE, Md. — Cambria Hotels, franchised by Choice Hotels International, Inc. (NYSE: CHH), joined Murphy Development Group and management company Crescent Hotels & Resorts to celebrate a major milestone with the grand opening of the Cambria Hotel Chicago Loop – Theatre District. The property is one of two downtown Chicago hotels to recently join the brand portfolio. The evening was highlighted by a Broadway-themed ceremony, including a special performance by actors from the award-winning musical Les Misérables, which recently began a national tour, including a three-week showing in Chicago at the Cadillac Palace Theatre. An open house was also held, showcasing the building’s stunning transformation to become the Cambria brand’s first adaptive re-use design.

Originally constructed in 1927, the 22-story, 199-room Cambria Hotel Chicago Loop – Theatre District, located at 32 W. Randolph St., is situated above the historic Ford Center for the Performing Arts Oriental Theatre. The property is in the center of the Chicago Loop, an energetic business district, and home to a number of Fortune 500 company headquarters, such as Boeing, Archer Daniels Midland, United Continental Holdings, and the Exelon Corporation. Block Thirty Seven, a mixed-use project which includes an assemblage of high-end apartments, restaurants and local retail outlets, is located directly across the street from the hotel, making it a uniquely convenient option for leisure and business travelers.

The Cambria Hotel Chicago Loop – Theatre District offers a décor that maintains the building’s colorful past through unique design features, while presenting a sleek 21st-century aesthetic as well as modern essentials. The property features a spacious lobby, flexible meeting space with integrated AV capabilities, and a high-design fitness center offering state-of-the-art exercise equipment. The property also includes contemporary onsite dining, serving a menu comprised of local specialties, liquor, wine, and local craft beers, as well as freshly prepared grab-and-go gourmet salads and sandwiches.

“As the Cambria Hotels brand rapidly expands across the country, the heart of downtown Chicago is a fantastic next stop, as it is steps away from major businesses as well as unrivaled entertainment, shopping and restaurants,” said Janis Cannon, senior vice president, upscale brands at Choice Hotels. “The Cambria Hotel Chicago Loop – Theatre District truly represents the best of the brand, given its prime location, aesthetic capturing the character of the local community and amenities, all of which make it the perfect match for the modern traveler. The property even has a unique added service where guests can reach out to local experts on social media for personalized recommendations during their stay.”

To meet the desires of today’s upscale travelers who want to maximize every moment of their trip, the Cambria Hotel Chicago Loop – Theatre District is launching a virtual concierge service entitled “Cambria Connectors.” This program enables guests the opportunity to receive real-time local recommendations via social media from two Chicago influencers, Chicago Food Authority and Kelly in the City using the hashtag “#CambriaConnectors.”

Featured speakers for the celebration included Cannon; John T. Murphy, Chairman and CEO of Murphy Development Group; and Evan Studer, Executive Vice President of Operations for Crescent Hotels & Resorts.

“Teaming up with the Cambria brand and Choice Hotels has been the ideal scenario to bring such an extraordinary property to fruition,” said Murphy. “The buildings of downtown Chicago all have stories behind them. This Cambria project is no exception and we are proud to deliver such an exceptional hotel product for Choice while embracing and preserving the city’s architectural culture.”

from Chicago Architecture https://www.chicagoarchitecture.org/2017/10/30/chicagos-theater-district-gets-a-new-hotel/

Holy Name Tower Gets a Name, Little Opposition

Two weeks ago we told you about a proposal to fill the surface parking lot across the street from Holy Name Cathedral with a shiny new dual-skyscraper project.  Now we know a little more about it.

Rendering of One Chicago SquareAbout a dozen dozen people turned out for a public meeting about the $700 million complex, which is being called One Chicago Square (1 West Chicago Avenue).  The people in attendance at the event hosted by 2nd Ward Alderman Brian Hopkins seemed interested, and the level of hostility was significantly lower than in meetings past.  Yes, there were concerns about the podium and the height and traffic, but this wasn’t the NIMBY crowd of yesteryear.

As we noted in our earlier article on this building, it will be two asymmetrical towers, designed by Hartshorne Plunkard Architects and Goettsch Partners for JDL Development.  The taller of the two mirroring Holy Name Cathedral’s belltower.  The larger of the two, at 76 stories, will be on the southeast corner of the block, trying to protect views from 1 Superior.  The smaller of the two, at 45 stories, will be on the northwest corner, with a nine-story retail podium connecting them.

Parking will be both in the podium, and underground.  The podium parking will be surrounded by residences so the general populace won’t have to stare at rows of bumpers.  Of the 900 parking spaces, more than 200 will be set aside for Holy Name Parish to replace the spaces lost from the surface lot.

The Chicago Tribune notes that with all its setbacks, it looks something like a glass version of 30 Rock in New York.  That’s a good thing.  The Trib also notes that the top of the building is still a work in progress.  Plans filed with the city show the top of the building reaching 1,011 feet.  But diagrams shown to the public at tonight’s meeting have it at 962 feet.

Rendering of One Chicago Square
Rendering of One Chicago Square
Rendering of One Chicago Square
Rendering of One Chicago Square
Rendering of One Chicago Square
Rendering of One Chicago Square

 

 

from Chicago Architecture https://www.chicagoarchitecture.org/2017/10/24/holy-name-tower-gets-a-name-little-opposition/

River North Building Appeals to Bulldogs, Comfy Footwear

Do you like bulldogs?  How about comfortable shoes?  If these sound like your kind of things, then you’ll be happy to know that progress is being made on the new residential block called The Ardus at 676 North LaSalle Street.

The Ardus under construction (Courtesy of River North Spy Joel)

The Ardus under construction (Courtesy of River North Spy Joel)

The Ardus is a project by Cedar Street and the Harlem Irving Companies.  It will bring another 149 new apartments to River North, on the corner of LaSalle Street and Huron.  As you can see in the photograph above from River North Spy Joel, the steel isn’t complete, but has topped out.  Also, the signs around the perimeter of the construction site feature bulldog silhouettes, and encourage women to ditch their high heels with the social media hashtag #WearFlats.

This is actually a two-part project designed by Booth Hansen.  It involves converting an existing old office building into residences, and also building an expansion of that building in the adjacent parking lot.  Because of its primo location, it only has 20 car parking spaces, and they’re all int he basement.

 

from Chicago Architecture https://www.chicagoarchitecture.org/2017/10/23/river-north-building-appeals-to-bulldogs-comfy-footwear/